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fjords, glaciers & geysers | cruise & stay

2nd Jun 2024 | 13 nights | Norwegian Cruise Line | Norwegian Prima

Golden Circle tour (balcony & above)
FREE all-inc drinks worth over £1200pp
Flights, baggage & Reykjavik stay
Zeebrugge (Bruges)
Amsterdam
Bergen
Geiranger
Alesund
Akureyri
Ísafjörður
Reykjavík
Golden Circle tour (balcony & above)
FREE all-inc drinks worth over £1200pp
Flights, baggage & Reykjavik stay

Fjords, Glaciers & Geysers | All-Inclusive Norway & Iceland

Embark on an enchanting voyage through Northern Europe aboard Norwegian Prima. Delight in the allure of European cities, traverse the Norwegian Fjords, and dive into an immersive Icelandic experience. Following this mesmerizing journey, you'll enjoy a 2-night stay in Reykjavik for further exploration. You can take advantage of remarkable savings with our exclusive fly, cruise & stay package inclusive of a Free at Sea upgrade, all ATOL protected.

Discover the treasures of Bruges, Amsterdam, Bergen, and the Norwegian Fjords' splendor before immersing yourself in Iceland's diverse landscapes and hospitable locales. Experience the unmatched luxury of the Norwegian Prima, boasting expansive outdoor spaces, upgraded amenities like the famed 'Waterfront,' an array of dining choices, diverse activities, and stellar entertainment — promising an unforgettable holiday in these captivating lands of contrast.

What's included?

  • 11-night cruise from Southampton to Reykjavik, Iceland
  • Premium Beverages - all-inclusive drinks - worth over £1200pp, plus ALL of the following:
    • $50 per stateroom shore excursion discount, per port of call, Wi-Fi package and Speciality dining package
  • 2-night post-cruise stay at a hand-picked central Reykjavik hotel (ask our team about extending your stay)
  • Golden Circle & Secret Lagoon tour (Balcony and above) - worth £100pp
  • Return flight to the UK with generous checked baggage allowance

What's included with the Cruise

NCL offer two simple price models. The base fare is available on all stateroom categories and includes:

  • Comfortable, well-appointed en-suite accommodation
  • Meals in the main dining rooms, snack and buffet restaurants
  • Daily stateroom attendant service
  • All entertainment unless part of a dining entertainment production onboard
  • Casino & nightclub entry
  • Access to well-appointed gyms
  • Complimentary room service continental breakfast (other times, a tray delivery charge applies)
  • Selected soft-drinks in buffet restaurants at meal times plus tea & coffee

NCL's Free at Sea option allows to you add on your choice of perks. Usually, you can choose two but during selected promotions, you may receive all perks. Prices vary by duration but start at just £199pp for a 7-night cruise. You can choose the following:

  • Premium beverages
  • Speciality dining 
  • Wi-Fi package
  • Excursion discounts
  • Guests 3 & 4 (when sharing with 2 adults) sail for taxes only - selected sailings only
    • When purchasing a Free at Sea package, all gratuities and service charges associated with the selected perk are included (some exceptions may apply in certain territorial waters)
  • Guests travelling in Suites (not Club Balcony Suites) or The Haven can take advantage of all applicable Free at Sea perks at no additional cost

Suites & The Haven Suites

Guests staying in Suites and The Haven accommodation can enjoy a host of upgraded services and amenities including:

  • Guests 1 & 2 receive all Free at Sea perks (drinks, speciality dining, Wi-Fi, shore excursion discount)
  • Haven accommodation get exclusive access to The Haven Courtyard area with private pool, sundeck, hot tub and fitness area
  • 24-hour trained and certified suite butler
  • Concierge service
  • White tablecloth in-suite dining & escort to your suite
  • Priority embarkation and disembarkation
  • Distinctive platinum keycard to ensure priority service throughout the ship
  • Priority access to onboard dining & entertainment options, plus early access to pre-booking prior to sailing.
  • Complimentary limousine service from pier to airport (Garden Villa H1 only)
  • Champagne, custom selection of spirits, fruit, bottled water & sodas (H1, H2, H3, H4 only)
  • Sparkling wine, bottled water & fruit on embarkation day (all other H & S categories)
  • 24-hour room service
  • Mini-bar and espresso/cappuccino maker
  • Special Haven menus
  • Gourmet treats delivered to the suite each evening
  • Invitations to exclusive breakfast, lunch and Cocktail part with the ship's officers
  • Bliss Collection by Norwegian™ pillow-top mattress
  • Fine linens, feather duvet and pillow menu
  • Plush bath robes, slippers and oversized towels

Cruise Circle Collection packages adhere to our 7 point charter:

  • Up-front, honest pricing
  • No hidden fees
  • No booking fees. Ever.
  • A personal service
  • Educational trips and ship visits
  • Good quality accommodation
  • No unreasonable flight times
Learn more about our charter

Similar Packages:

Day
Date
 
Arrival
Departure
 
1
2nd Jun 2024 Sunday
Southampton
 
17:00
Southampton
Cruise
Southampton

Located on the south coast of England, Southampton served as the historic ocean liner gateway for the British Empire and the intense North Atlantic passenger trade to the U.S. and Canada. Today it is the U.K.'s - and indeed Europe's -- leading cruise port.

Best known as the homeport of Cunard's Queen Mary 2, Southampton now hosts a wide variety of cruise ships in the booming European cruise market with the principal lines being Cunard, Fred. Olsen, Royal Caribbean, P&O Cruises and Saga Cruises.

For most cruise passengers, it's the first and/or last port on a European cruise or Atlantic crossing. But New York it ain't, and the first thing you see as you approach is not the Statue of Liberty or the Empire State Building, but a giant IKEA.

A pleasant, bustling city of around a quarter of a million inhabitants, Southampton has several areas of interest, though much of its historic medieval character was destroyed during World War II. In 1620, the Mayflower left from just outside the existing city walls, and the waterfront recalls this historic voyage. From Mayflower Park, you can enjoy watching the container ships pass en route to and from the freight terminal beyond the Western Docks, cruise ships departing from three separate locations, and excursion boats and cross-harbour ferries flitting around the port. Today, it is a modern shopping destination, business centre and university town (the University of Southampton is a major British research university; among its well-known alumni is QM2 designer Stephen Payne with a large commercial port in addition to its year-round cruise operations.

It's not somewhere you want to hang around (unless you want to pick up some flat-pack furniture), and most visiting cruise passengers will use Southampton as a gateway to nearby London (an hour and 10 minutes away by train). It is also a good starting point for the Isle of Wight (reachable by ferry) and the surrounding county of Hampshire and Wiltshire, with their numerous attractions.

2
3rd Jun 2024 Monday
Zeebrugge (Bruges)
09:00
18:00
Zeebrugge (Bruges)
Cruise
Zeebrugge (Bruges)

Brugge (in Flemish -- it's Bruges in French) is one of the most visited cities in Europe and is the number one destination for passengers on cruise ships calling at Zeebrugge. Visitors flock here, not for a specific museum or historical location, but to wander amidst the city's stunning examples of Flemish and Renaissance architecture and immerse themselves in the vitality of the two main squares -- Markt and Berg. There is always so much going on in Brugges -- from flower and produce markets to rides for children, bustling cafes and restaurants and old-fashioned people watching.

Never mind that Brugge's medieval appearance is largely a recent recreation. The city was rediscovered by 19th century tourists, mostly from England, heading to the site of the battle of Waterloo. Its growing popularity generated an interest to fix up the city following its downfall from one of the Hanseatic League's most important trading cities. Cloth had been the main commodity; the English wool came by ship directly to Brugge until the waterways silted up in the 15th century. The city fell into disrepair as much of the population drifted away, but in the 19th and early 20th century, Brugge was rebuilt in the traditional styles.

From the two squares, lanes fan out to wonderful commercial and residential streetscapes, and many of the canals have fringing walkways. Perhaps one of the best views of the city is from a canal boat looking up at the historic buildings and stone bridges. The further you go from the center -- and you don't have to venture more than a few blocks -- the more serene the city becomes. All you need is a walking tour map and alert senses to come away enchanted with Brugge as millions have before you.

3
4th Jun 2024 Tuesday
Amsterdam
07:00
18:00
Amsterdam
Cruise
Amsterdam

There is a fairytale quality to the tree-lined canal streets of Amsterdam. Boutiques, cafes, apartments and hotels may hide behind the facades of the gabled townhouses, but the look of this beautiful old city has not changed much since its 17th-century Golden Age. Some 7,000 historic buildings remain, many of them beautiful merchants' mansions, located along canals that are laid out in five concentric circles, connected by bridges and intriguing small streets. No matter how many times you walk along the canals, they are enchanting to see, even when traffic and whizzing bicycles dispel the Old-World illusion. On a silent Sunday morning or on a summer evening when the old facades are floodlit, the city is magical.

Amsterdam is small enough that much of the city can be covered on foot, allowing visitors to savor sights such as the charming no-two-alike gables atop the houses, houseboats bedecked with potted greenery and masses of blooms in the colorful, floating flower market. Shops offering antiques and avant-garde art beckon everywhere. Outdoor markets, selling everything from postage stamps and parakeets to "junk-tiques," are another intriguing facet of the city.

Considered one of Europe's major art capitals, Amsterdam boasts three great Dutch museums as well as a branch of the Hermitage, the famous trove of art treasures in St. Petersburg, Russia. The Anne Frank House and Rembrandt's home are also popular attractions. In the performing arts, the city has two international stars: the National Ballet and the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra. (A 2008 poll from classical music magazine Gramophone called the latter the world's best.)

The canal streets of the old city are protected by ordinance and will never change, but Amsterdam is expanding outward and architecture buffs will find both modern and historic neighborhoods to explore. Though quite close to the old city, Passenger Terminal Amsterdam (PTA), known as "the wave" for its free-form facade (shaped like a whale), is the part of the Eastern Docklands area where shipping docks have given way to neighborhoods of striking contemporary design that now house more than 20,000 people. Muziekgebouw aan het IJ, a concert hall for jazz and modern music, is adjacent to the terminal, and ongoing construction will bring many more amenities, including hotels.

With so much to see and do, Amsterdam makes for a rewarding stay before or after cruising.

4
5th Jun 2024 Wednesday
At Sea
 
 
5
6th Jun 2024 Thursday
Bergen
07:00
16:00
Bergen
Cruise
Bergen

Bergen, known as the "Gateway to the Fjords," is Norway's second-largest city. But with only about 260,000 inhabitants, it projects the warmth and accessibility of a much smaller community. The Gulf Stream softens the weather there, and the winters are mild with little snow. Shrouded in history, the city's streets are flanked with centuries-old churches and quaint shops and homes connected by a labyrinth of backyard pathways. Two picturesque and inviting landmarks make orientation easy: the wharf area and the museum-surrounded ornamental lake and parklands are within ten minutes from each other by foot. Most of Bergen proper's attractions and activities also lie within a short walk of those points, as does the main cruise pier. The nearly endless hours of summer sunlight seem to lend an unhurried quality to the pace of Bergen daily life-- but interestingly, this is a port that sees cruise passengers during all four seasons, thanks to the year-round itineraries offered by Hurtigruten. Most residents are patient and helpful to a fault, and tourists are almost always made to feel welcome. With great dining, art, historical and natural assets, and decent shopping, Bergen has something for everyone. Keep in mind, however, that Norway residents are paid high wages, and the cost of living is high as a result, which means visitors might be in for some sticker shock. Bergen is a clean, friendly, accessible seaside town, rich in history and art, and it's easily navigated on foot or by public transport. But the city is also a jumping-off point for a wide range of longer-term pursuits for those who have more time to explore it while visiting independently.

6
7th Jun 2024 Friday
Geiranger
08:00
22:00
Geiranger
Cruise
Geiranger

Geiranger is a tiny little village, situated at the end of the UNESCO World Heritage-protected Geirangerfjord. The real draw is the fjord itself, with its green mountainsides, snowcapped peaks and fairytale-esque waterfalls. You'll get up-close views of the fjord -- and the famous Seven Sisters and the Suitor waterfalls -- as you sail in and out of Geiranger; in summer, it'll be light out for both the early morning arrival and afternoon or early evening departure. The scenic cruising will be the highlight of a Norwegian fjords itinerary.

The town of Geiranger can be traversed from end to end in about five minutes. It's got the requisite souvenir shops, restaurants serving up reindeer and caramel-tasting brown goat cheese, a charming old church and the Fjordcenter to get your fjord 411. But mostly it serves as a jumping-off point for tours in the area. For a bird's-eye view of the fjord scenery, head up to scenic viewpoints like Dalsnibba or Eagle's Bend or take to the skies in a helicopter. Or go the other direction, and hop in a kayak to get closer to nature and feel the enormity of the mountains above you. For a bit of history and culture, visit a mountain farm and learn about how people live in this remote area.

About 150 to 200 cruise ships visit Geiranger every year, bringing more than 700,000 tourists during the May-through-September tourist season. With up to five ships in port at a time -- you wouldn't think the harbour could fit that many -- tours book up and the streets in town get packed. If you've got your heart set on a specific tour, do your research and consider booking in advance. Geiranger is such a beautiful place, it would be a shame not to see it to its fullest.

7
8th Jun 2024 Saturday
Alesund
07:00
17:00
Alesund
Cruise
Alesund

Alesund is located on a series of islands along Norway's coast. It is best known for its art nouveau architecture, which you can see walking through town and learn about at the Art Nouveau Center. After much of the town burned in a 1904 fire, the city was rebuilt in this striking architectural style.

8
9th Jun 2024 Sunday
At Sea
 
 
9
10th Jun 2024 Monday
Akureyri
09:00
20:00
Akureyri
Cruise
Akureyri

The second-largest city in Iceland (yet still small, with fewer than 18,000 residents), Akureyri has become a regular stop for cruise ships visiting the island on a Norwegian fjords cruise, as well as those on transatlantic repositionings. Located on Iceland's longest fjord, Eyjafjörður, Akureyri has been settled since Vikings arrived in the 9th century and has long been dominant in fishing, thanks to an ice-free port. Although cruise ships only visit during the summer, the town has a healthy winter tourism scene, with several ski resorts close by. Thus, you'll find many outdoor clothing stores, as well as restaurants, cafes and bars, in the city's downtown. A call in Akureyri provides cruisers with a cute town to explore and makes a perfect gateway to northern Iceland's geothermal phenomena. Lake Mývatn, home to bubbling hotpots, thermal baths, craters and lava formations, is less than two hours away. For a once-in-a-lifetime experience, consider a flightseeing trip over this geothermal wonderland; if an eruption is going on, you might even see lava spurting into the air (as tourists did in fall 2014, when a fissure developed in nearby Holuhraun). Akureyri is also a good place to hire an independent tour operator for outdoor pursuits, such as whale watching, horseback riding, hiking and Jeep adventures. Or you can rent a car and explore the country's Ring Road. Make sure you wear layers and bring a raincoat; Iceland's weather is notoriously fickle even though Akureyri generally has warmer temperatures than other parts of the island.

10
11th Jun 2024 Tuesday
Ísafjörður
09:00
18:00
Ísafjörður
Cruise
Ísafjörður

When cruising through Ísafjörður, Iceland, visitors will be subject to incredible views upon their arrival, but there's even more to enjoy ashore. The town features a number or restaurants and shops and is considered quite bustling compared to some of its neighbours. While visiting, travellers can partake in hiking and biking excursions, go horseback riding or fishing and even play a round of golf. The town is also an access point to the nature reserve in Hornstrandir -- one of the region's more noted attractions.

11
12th Jun 2024 Wednesday
Reykjavík
07:00
 
Reykjavík
Cruise
Reykjavík

Europe's northernmost and westernmost capital is a delightful destination, part old Norse, part modern city, with a quirky personality of its own. The puffin, troll and elf souvenirs found in gift stores are apt mascots for a city with a decidedly playful streak. More than half of Iceland's population lives in Reykjavík (or nearby), in one of the world's smallest capital cities -- some 190,000 people. Cruise ships are increasingly paying calls on Reykjavík from late May to early October, especially during the summer months, when the daylight literally lasts 'round the clock. Visitors and residents alike seem to stay awake, golfing, strolling the compact town's picturesque streets, drinking Gull beer at sidewalk cafes and cycling along the seafront promenade. Many believe that Reykjavík's character is more defined in winter, when daunting weather and 20-hour nights are defied by rollicking pubs and a sense of humour. But, locals laugh at the climate, whether calm or tempestuous. They keep warm in the iconic handsome sweaters for which Iceland is well known; the long hours indoors and out inspire artisans, evidenced by many shops that display lovely local art and clothing. This is a city that has learned to make the best of things. The Iceland landscape is bare and covered with volcanic rock. With no trees for building houses, 18th-century settlers used driftwood that floated in from the sea, covering the wood in sheets of corrugated tin and painting walls and roofs in vivid colours to brighten the scene. The rock that abounds was turned into material for a fine stone Parliament building, erected in 1881. Citizens have planted and nurtured welcome oases of green. The geothermal springs that bubble underground have been put to work to provide hot water for residents. Reykjavík has experienced much advancement in the past few years. Progress is plain to see in the sleek, contemporary buildings that are changing the cityscape. Several worthwhile museums salute local history and art, and whimsical street murals dot the city centre. With fishing still a dominant occupation, restaurants serve up delectable seafood, and gourmet dining of all kinds is plentiful and popular. But, if you ask natives for their favourite eating place, the answer most often will be a simple hot dog stand near the harbour. Reykjavík is a safe city, compact and easy to navigate on foot. As charming as it is, no visit to Iceland is complete without getting out into the vast interior, which lies at the city's doorstep. Seriously, how can you not love a place where sheep have the right of way? Cruise lines often assign ships to overnight in Reykjavík, offering passengers more than the typical eight-hour port experience, but my greatest regret is that visitors don't have even more time to explore this charming land, where the balance of urban sophistication and nature at its most rugged is unique. If you regard cruise travel as a chance to sample places you might want to return to later for longer stays, I can't think of a better recommendation than Reykjavík.

12
13th Jun 2024 Thursday
Reykjavík
Reykjavik
08:00
 
 
 
Reykjavík
Cruise
Reykjavík

Europe's northernmost and westernmost capital is a delightful destination, part old Norse, part modern city, with a quirky personality of its own. The puffin, troll and elf souvenirs found in gift stores are apt mascots for a city with a decidedly playful streak. More than half of Iceland's population lives in Reykjavík (or nearby), in one of the world's smallest capital cities -- some 190,000 people. Cruise ships are increasingly paying calls on Reykjavík from late May to early October, especially during the summer months, when the daylight literally lasts 'round the clock. Visitors and residents alike seem to stay awake, golfing, strolling the compact town's picturesque streets, drinking Gull beer at sidewalk cafes and cycling along the seafront promenade. Many believe that Reykjavík's character is more defined in winter, when daunting weather and 20-hour nights are defied by rollicking pubs and a sense of humour. But, locals laugh at the climate, whether calm or tempestuous. They keep warm in the iconic handsome sweaters for which Iceland is well known; the long hours indoors and out inspire artisans, evidenced by many shops that display lovely local art and clothing. This is a city that has learned to make the best of things. The Iceland landscape is bare and covered with volcanic rock. With no trees for building houses, 18th-century settlers used driftwood that floated in from the sea, covering the wood in sheets of corrugated tin and painting walls and roofs in vivid colours to brighten the scene. The rock that abounds was turned into material for a fine stone Parliament building, erected in 1881. Citizens have planted and nurtured welcome oases of green. The geothermal springs that bubble underground have been put to work to provide hot water for residents. Reykjavík has experienced much advancement in the past few years. Progress is plain to see in the sleek, contemporary buildings that are changing the cityscape. Several worthwhile museums salute local history and art, and whimsical street murals dot the city centre. With fishing still a dominant occupation, restaurants serve up delectable seafood, and gourmet dining of all kinds is plentiful and popular. But, if you ask natives for their favourite eating place, the answer most often will be a simple hot dog stand near the harbour. Reykjavík is a safe city, compact and easy to navigate on foot. As charming as it is, no visit to Iceland is complete without getting out into the vast interior, which lies at the city's doorstep. Seriously, how can you not love a place where sheep have the right of way? Cruise lines often assign ships to overnight in Reykjavík, offering passengers more than the typical eight-hour port experience, but my greatest regret is that visitors don't have even more time to explore this charming land, where the balance of urban sophistication and nature at its most rugged is unique. If you regard cruise travel as a chance to sample places you might want to return to later for longer stays, I can't think of a better recommendation than Reykjavík.

Reykjavik
Hotel

Check in to your hotel for a 2-night stay

13
14th Jun 2024 Friday
Reykjavik
Golden Circle & Secret Lagoon Tour
 
 
 
 
Reykjavik
Hotel

Day at leisure or join the Golden Circle & Secret Lagoon tour

Golden Circle & Secret Lagoon Tour
Experience
The Golden Circle Classic is a bestselling day tour! Follow in the footsteps of the vikings of old as you walk down into the rift valley where the American and Eurasian continental plates are literally pulling apart at Þingvellir National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site and the birthplace of the oldest existing parliament.
Witness the steaming geothermal springs as the ground trembles and hot water spouts spectacularly skywards from the famous Strokkur Geyser at home of the one-and-only original geyser and Iceland's most iconic natural attraction. Experience the magnificence and power of Gullfoss Waterfall, a set of glacial river cascades falling 32 meters into a narrow canyon with a thunderous roar.
The last stop on your tour, and the most relaxing, is the Secret Lagoon. Whatever the weather, this is the perfect spot for relaxing in between sightseeing and enjoying Icelandic nature. Indeed, the geothermal hot water is a hidden treat that Icelanders have been enjoying for generations! Around the Secret Lagoon you can also find several hot spots, even a little Geysir that erupts every 5 minutes, showing off for the guests bathing in the hot spring.
Join a tour and step aboard one of the new buses, fully equipped with WiFi connected computer tablets for each guest. The tablets provide you with a continuous stream of relevant information along the journey with a GPS synced Audio Guide, available with a choice of 10 languages. Along the tour the local hosts will make your experience comfortable and are happy to answer any questions you might have about a peculiar country. In each seat you will also find a USB outlet to charge any of your devices. This is the perfect combination of activities including stunning sightseeing and a heavenly bath in a geothermal hot spring set in a gorgeous location!
14
15th Jun 2024 Saturday
Fly to the UK
 
 
Fly to the UK
Flights

Check out of your hotel and make your way to the airport for your flight home

Norwegian Prima is the first cruise ship in Norwegian Cruise Line's Prima Class of ships, and was delievered in August 2022. The ship will be smaller than the Breakaway and Breakaway-Plus class ships, carrying 3,215 passengers versus more than 4,000. The ship was built at Fincantieri shipyard in Italy, a new partnership for the line. In honour of the ship's Italian heritage, the hull art is designed by Italian graffiti artist Manuel Di Rita, known as Peeta. The ship has a distinctive look compared to the Breakaway and Breakaway-Plus class of ships that preceded it.

Norwegian Prima has an expanded outdoor space with pools and restaurants on Deck 8 called Ocean Boulevard. The line's luxury ship-within-a-ship, The Haven has been relocated to the aft so all cabins and suites, as well as the sundeck and amenities, face the water, just like a Miami waterfront condo building.

Debut and Itineraries

The ship will have a string of inaugural cruises beginning August 2022. Norwegian Prima will make 10-day voyages from Amsterdam and Copenhagen, sailing Northern Europe, the Norwegian Fjords and Baltic region. In September 23, 2022, Norwegian Prima will sail from Southampton on a 12-day transatlantic, ending in New York. The ship will be making an October 10 cruise to Bermuda, before leaving New York to transition to the Caribbean. It will sail a series of voyages from Galveston in October before beginning a mini-season of Miami sailings from November 19 to December 3, 2022.

From December 11 to March 19, 2023, Norwegian Prima will homeport in Port Canaveral, sailing the Western Caribbean. In March 2023, it moves back up to New York to make Bermuda sailings through May 7, 2023. From there, the ship will make an 11-day transatlantic journey from New York to Iceland, where it will have an immersive Icelandic itinerary. In summer 2023, Norwegian Prima will offer a mix of 10- and 11-day sailings of Norway and Iceland, using Reykjavik and Southampton as homeports. The summer season concludes with a 14-day roundtrip sailing from Southampton on September 17, calling on Ireland, Iceland and Norway.

Ocean Boulevard

Located on Deck Eight, Ocean Boulevard is 44,000 square feet long and wraps around the entire deck, encompassing not just restaurants and bars, but pools and relaxation space. A first for Norwegian is The Concourse, an outdoor sculpture garden with installations designed by Alexander Krivosheiw. Two Oceanwalk glass bridges are also new, also designed for the Instagram set. La Terraza is a new open-air lounge, meant as a retreat for sea views and a place for passengers to take it easy. Infinity Beach is another new concept for Norwegian. The highlight here are two infinity pools, each on one side of the ship, to bring bathers closer to the sea.

Indulge Food Hall

Located at the back of Deck 8, Indulge Food Hall is an upscale open-air marketplace-style eatery, with 11 different venues serving different types of cuisine. Among the venues that are new to the line include Seaside Rotisserie, serving rotisserie chicken and other items; Nudls, which will have noodle dishes from around the world and Tamara, serving classic Indian dishes and vegetarian options. The Latin Quarter will serve "classic Latin food with a twist," while the Tapas Food Truck will have elevated Latin-inspired street food. Garden Kitchen will be a source of customized salads. Sweet lovers will gravitate to Just Desserts and Just Ice Cream. Besides these new venues, Indulge Food Hall will be home to the returning restaurant Q Texas Smokehouse, as well as Coco's sweets and Starbucks.

Other Ocean Boulevard Restaurants

Ocean Boulevard will have three speciality restaurants with indoor/outdoor seating. Onda By Scarpetta debuted on Norwegian Encore, and is also on Norwegian Spirit. Los Lobos is the line's premium Mexican venue. The Local Bar & Grill has been revamped as an upscale beach club, and will have live music, cocktails and Americana cuisine.

The Haven

The biggest design change on Norwegian Prima is the relocation of The Haven to the back of the ship. The 107 Haven suites will now have their own private elevators, which take them to the rooms on Decks 10 through 15 and the Haven public areas on Decks 16 and 17. The new Haven Sundeck has its own infinity pool looking out the aft of the ship. It moves away from the former Haven concept, which had an indoor pool and interior courtyard. The Haven on Norwegian Prima also contains a new outdoor spa, with a glass-walled sauna and cold room.

Best for...

Active families, picky eaters, and couples/groups who love to bar hop

Not the best for...

People who can't stand crowds, or those seeking a relaxed onboard environment

Who goes on Norwegian Cruise Line cruise ships?

Norwegian cruise ships draw a diverse crowd, though the majority of passengers on ships sailing to the Caribbean and in Alaska and Hawaii hail from North America. You'll find a decent number of people from other English-speaking countries, and smaller numbers from South America and Europe. On European cruises, North Americans still dominate but you'll find more people from the United Kingdom and other European countries. You'll find plenty of young families onboard Norwegian ships, especially during holidays and school breaks. However, the line's newest ship, Norwegian Bliss, is less family-friendly than the line's other ships, with all the kids clubs on the lowest levels of the ship and onboard entertainment that is decidedly adult. Generally speaking, Norwegian Cruise Line attracts mostly middle-aged and older couples, as well as groups of friends of all ages.


Do I have to dress up on a Norwegian Cruise Line cruise?

Norwegian Cruise Line maintains a casual atmosphere onboard; during the day, casual wear is the norm. There's no formal dress code at night either, though most people do change into something slightly less casual for dinner. Additionally, some of the speciality extra-fee restaurants do require long pants, collared shirts and closed-toe shoes. Most evenings you'll see men in dark jeans or khakis and collared shirts, and women in blouses with slacks or skirts, or sundresses. Don't be surprised if you see people in shorts in the main dining rooms. Norwegian doesn't have any formal nights, but there is an optional Norwegian's Night Out at least once per sailing, for which passengers are encouraged to dress up. You'll rarely see a tux or gown, but suits and cocktail dresses are not unheard of. Norwegian ships also typically hold several themed nights (glow party, '70s or '80s, etc.) during a typical sailing. You might want to bring a few appropriate items, such as white clothing for the glow and white parties or bell bottoms for '70s night.


Is everything free on Norwegian Cruise Line cruises?

No. Unless you have an all-inclusive dining or beverage package (which you can buy), you'll have to pay extra for most gratuities, speciality dining, room service, all drinks (alcoholic and non, except water, select juices at breakfast, and coffee and tea), shore excursions, visits to the spa and any retail purchases, including photos. On the newest ships, you'll also have to pay for some of the entertainment options and even some of the top-deck fun: On Norwegian Bliss, for example, the laser tag and go-karts cost extra.


What are Norwegian Cruise Line's most popular activities?

On warm-weather cruises, the main pool is the line's most popular spot onboard. On ships with water slides, ropes courses, go-kart tracks and laser tag, these are also popular and often require a wait of up to 30 minutes or more. Inside, you'll find activities that range from trivia, bingo and Deal or No Deal during the day to song-and-dance revues or Broadway shows in the theatre and live music or cabaret shows in the evening. Norwegian ships also have a lively bar nightlife. There's also an always-busy casino, which opens when the ship is out to sea.


Prices based on:

Inside
Inside

  • Sleeps up to 2
  • Convertible queen-size bed
  • Extra bedding available for additional guests
  • Bathroom with shower
  • Some connect to adjacent staterooms, offering flexibility for families and groups
  • Approximate size 14.8 - 23.3 sq. m.
  • Cat Cabin Grade
    Cruise

    Oceanview with Round Window
    Oceanview with Round Window

  • Sleeps up to 2
  • Bathroom with shower
  • Convertible queen-size bed
  • Some connect to adjacent staterooms for additional space & comfort
  • Approximate size 17.2 sq. m
  • Cat Cabin Grade
    Cruise

    Balcony
    Balcony

    • Sleeps up to 2
    • Convertible queen-size bed
    • En-suite bathroom with shower
    • Private balcony
    • Some connect to adjacent staterooms - perfect for larger groups and families
    • Approximate size 17-27 sq. m. Balcony size approximately 4-6 sq. m

    Cat Cabin Grade
    Cruise

    Forward-Facing Club Balcony Suite
    Forward-Facing Club Balcony Suite

    • Club Balcony Suites typically offer a little more space than Balcony Staterooms. All feature two lower beds that convert to a queen-size bed
    • Sleeps up to 4
    • Convertible queen-size bed
    • Sitting area, some with convertible sofa-bed
    • Enhanced bathroom suite
    • Private balcony with stunning forward views
    • Approximate size 15.4 - 18.2 sq. m. Balcony size approximately 7 sq. m

    Cat Cabin Grade
    Cruise

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